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Outstanding Reconstruction of Ancient Egypt in Next Assassin’s Creed Including Combat-Free Educational Mode

Outstanding Reconstruction of Ancient Egypt in Next Assassin’s Creed Including Combat-Free Educational Mode



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Gaming fans can now explore ancient Egypt without all the blood and guts in Assassin’s Creed Origins. Ubisoft has just announced a new educational mode called ‘Discovery Tour’, which enables users to explore ancient cities, the lives of pharaohs, reconstructions of real artifacts and ancient practices like mummification, in outstanding detail.

“We had to work very closely with historians and Egyptian experts to help us fill in the gaps of Egyptian life not easily found in history books,” writes Ubisoft in their press Q&A . “For some elements, this lack of reference also challenged us to create and illustrate parts of Ancient Egypt rather than recreate known history as we did with past games. For this, we heavily relied on the amazing work done by our Art team to really capture the look and overall feel of what Ancient Egypt would have been like at the time.”

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A scene from the new Assassin’s Creed, called ‘Origins’. Credit: Ubisoft

Assassin’s Creed, Where Historical Fiction Meets Historical Fact

Assassin’s Creed, the action-adventure video game series developed by Ubisoft, mixes historical fiction with real-world historical events and figures, taking players from ancient Jerusalem and Damascus, to Ottoman-held Constantinople, 15 th century Florence, Venice, and Rome, and Victorian Era London, enabling them to experience in vivid detail major historical events including the Crusades, the Seven Years’ war across North America, the French Revolution, 18th century marauding pirates, and the secret life and work of the Knights Templar.

Now in the next series, Assassin’s Creed Origins, which is due to be released worldwide on October 27 for Xbox One, players will explore Ptolemaic Egypt in life-like detail.

Assassin’s Creed Origins – Ancient Egypt, 49 BC

“In terms of the exact date, the action starts in 49 BC, at a pivotal time in Egypt’s history,” writes Ubisoft. “After centuries of grandeur and accomplishments, Ancient Egypt is now at the beginning of its demise. Soon the line of Pharaohs will end, the Gods will die and the way of life will forever change. A new world order is coming. And it all starts with these bigger than life people like Cleopatra fighting to ascend her throne.”

The new game will take players on a journey through history, triggering the fantasies and mysticism that have surrounded ancient Egypt for thousands of years - What is underneath the great Pyramids? Who are these men with animal heads? Who were the Gods and what did they do?

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Never-Before-Seen Reconstruction of Ancient Egypt

The Ubisoft team included historians and Egyptologists who worked with graphic artists through the entire process of the game’s development, enabling them to fill in the gaps of Ancient Egyptian life not easily found in history books.

“This is the first time in Assassin’s Creed that we’re recreating an entire country in all its diversity,” writes Ubisoft. “That means not only cities or villages, but also wilderness… The Nile Delta for instance is lush and full of birds and water animals like hippos and crocodiles, while the region of Giza is really dry, with the omnipresence of orange sand and more chances to cross the path of snakes or hyenas. It’s true also for urban areas: Siwa’s marketplace boasts a totally different atmosphere from the ones of Memphis or Alexandria with their tall buildings.”

Assassin’s Creed Discovery Tour

Aside from the outstanding graphics that exceed the realistic and vivid people and landscapes already seen previously in the series, what really sets Assassin’s Creed Origins apart from the rest is its new Discovery Tour, an educational mode which enables players to explore the gaming environment combat-free, delving into the history of ancient Egypt as they go through dozens of guided tours curated by historians and Egyptologists. The new mode “lets players roam the entire game world without constraints or threats, exploring a sprawling landscape that includes Memphis, Alexandria, the Sand Sea, and the Giza Plateau at their own pace," says Ubisoft.

Since the educational mode will be free of all the blood, guts and murder seen in standard play, Ubisoft is hoping the Discovery Tour will be used by educational institutions as a novel and interactive medium to teach ancient history to their students, bringing the subject to life without the violence.


This Game Has the Most Realistic Reconstruction of Ancient Egypt Ever Produced

The latest Assassin’s Creed game by Ubisoft, called ‘Origins’ was released on Friday, and it has the most authentic reconstruction of ancient Egypt ever produced.

Game designers worked closely with Historians and Egyptologists to create a magnificent, highly-realistic world that brings Ancient Egypt to life in stunning detail.

And for the first time, the game includes a combat-free ‘discovery mode’ so it can be used by teachers as an educational tool in classrooms.

“We had to work very closely with historians and Egyptian experts to help us fill in the gaps of Egyptian life not easily found in history books,” writes Ubisoft in their press Q&A.

“For some elements, this lack of reference also challenged us to create and illustrate parts of Ancient Egypt rather than recreate known history as we did with past games. For this, we heavily relied on the amazing work done by our Art team to really capture the look and overall feel of what Ancient Egypt would have been like at the time.”

One of Ubisoft’s consultants for the project was Evelyne Ferron, Egyptologist and professor of history at the Université de Sherbrooke and a professor of general history, research, and policy methodology at Collège Mérici in Quebec City.

I helped the team… to figure out things like what would houses look like and what were the colors used at the time. One specific thing I had to think about was the fact that at the time of Cleopatra, the pyramids of course were there, but they were old at the time, more than 2,000 t0 2,500 years old,” said Ms Ferron [via MobileSyrup].

Assassin’s Creed: Where Historical Fiction Meets Historical Fact

Assassin’s Creed, the action-adventure video game series developed by Ubisoft, mixes historical fiction with real-world historical events and figures, taking players from ancient Jerusalem and Damascus, to Ottoman-held Constantinople, 15th century Florence, Venice, and Rome, and Victorian Era London, enabling them to experience in vivid detail major historical events.

Now in the latest series, Assassin’s Creed Origins, players explore Ptolemaic Egypt in life-like detail.

“In terms of the exact date, the action starts in 49 BC, at a pivotal time in Egypt’s history,” writes Ubisoft.

“After centuries of grandeur and accomplishments, Ancient Egypt is now at the beginning of its demise. Soon the line of Pharaohs will end, the Gods will die and the way of life will forever change. A new world order is coming. And it all starts with these bigger than life people like Cleopatra fighting to ascend her throne”

The new game takes players on a journey through history, triggering the fantasies and mysticism that has surrounded ancient Egypt for thousands of years – What is underneath the great Pyramids? Who are these men with animal heads? Who were the Gods and what did they do?

But what about those that want to see the amazing graphics and reconstruction of ancient Egypt without all the blood and guts?

Thanks to a new mode called ‘Discovery Tour’, players can now do just that. The educational mode enables users to delve into the history of ancient Egypt as they go through dozens of guided tours curated by historians and Egyptologists, exploring ancient cities, the lives of pharaohs, reconstructions of real artifacts and ancient practices like mummification, in outstanding detail.

“You have different stations and when you reach one, you have a written explanation — an example being the mummification process — but you’ll also have an orator who will tell you about mummification,” said Ms Ferron [via MobileSyrup].

“You’ll even have sound, so there’s this ‘squishy’ sound when [non-player characters] take out the organs. It’s visual, it’s informative and also written down, so even depending on the age of the student, elementary, high school, university, it’s mostly universal.”

Whether you are a gaming fan or not, there is little doubt that history buffs will be awe-struck by the visually-stunning reconstruction of ancient Egypt seen in Assassin’s Creed: Origins.


Discovery Tour: Ancient Greece Coming To Assassin's Creed Odyssey This Fall

Assassin's Creed Odyssey is to get a Discovery Tour mode. The feature will be called Discovery Tour: Ancient Greece (or to give it its full title, Discovery Tour by Assassin's Creed: Ancient Greece) and will launch for the game in fall this year.

Discovery Tour: Ancient Greece follows on from the Discovery Tour mode featured in Assassin's Creed Origins. The mode will allow you to explore the world of Assassin's Creed Odyssey without worrying about combat or "gameplay constraints", according to Ubisoft. It's intended as an educational mode to teach you about Ancient Greece. If you're on the fence about whether you want something like this, it'll be a free update, so it won't cost you anything to check it out.

Ubisoft says Discovery Tour: Ancient Greece will keep all the features fans loved about Assassin's Creed Origins' Discovery Tour. While exploring Ancient Greece, you'll learn about the history of ancient landmarks, the day-to-day activities of common people, and the lives of notable figures in history. You'll be able to travel throughout the game's 29 regions to over 300 stations. There will be five different tour themes available: philosophy, architecture, daily life, war, and myths. Each tour will examine the Ancient Greece of Assassin's Creed Odyssey through one of these lenses. According to Ubisoft, the game features "the most accurate 3D interactive reconstruction of Ancient Greece ever made".

Unlike Assassin's Creed Origins' Discovery Tour mode, Discovery Tour: Ancient Greece will quiz players at the end of each tour. This quiz system will be based on Assassin's Creed Odyssey's dialogue trees. Ubisoft is also promising "new and exciting features that allow players to learn the way they want". We're not sure exactly what that means yet. Stay tuned for more info on this feature as we get it.


'Assassin's Creed Origins' Will Have A Completely Combat-Free 'Discovery' Mode

I have taken hundreds of thousands of virtual lives in video games over the years, thousands in the Assassin’s Creed series alone, as the name implies. But for Assassin’s Creed Origins, Ubisoft is doing something pretty cool that involves steering clear of the game’s trademark murder and mayhem.

Ubisoft is introducing something called the “Discovery Tour” to Assassin’s Creed Origins, a free mode that eliminates all combat from the game, and really any central story components whatsoever. Instead, it will be a walking (and climbing) tour of Ancient Egypt used simply for educational purposes. Here’s what they’re saying about it:

“In this dedicated mode, players can free roam the entire interactive 3D recreation of Ancient Egypt in Assassin’s Creed Origins, free of combat, storyline or time constraints. From Alexandria to Memphis, the Nile Delta to the Great Sand Sea, the Giza plateau to the Faiyum Oasis, players can immerse themselves like never before in the rich history of Ancient Egypt. Discovery Tour will offer dozens of guided tours curated by historians and Egyptologists, each with a focus on a different aspect of Ptolemaic Egypt, such as the Great Pyramids, mummification or the life of Cleopatra.”

That sounds…incredibly cool?

Ubisoft has always tried to go for at least some semblance of historical accuracy in its period games, other than obvious alterations like Leonardo Da Vinci designing weapons for assassins and such. But the wider picture, the historical setting, the major forces at work and the smaller details, are usually paid incredibly close attention to. Assassin’s Creed Unity, for instance, was a widely panned game at launch for being a technical mess, but once it was fixed, it was a pretty gorgeous, thoroughly interesting representation of the French Revolution.

Ubisoft is now going all the way with this concept with the Discovery Tour, and it’s easy to see how this could even be used in classroom settings as a particularly cool teacher brings in a PS4 and lets the kids explore ancient Egypt in Discovery mode and report back their findings.

I’d like to see more games do stuff like this, but Ubisoft is kind of in a unique situation here, as no one else builds sandboxes of real-world locations with this much detail. Call of Duty or Battlefield could do something like this with World Wars, but both have linear campaigns. And I don’t imagine learning the culture or significance of Los Santos or Liberty City would be uh, terribly educational from Rockstar. I’m genuinely having a tough time thinking of another game that could pull this off, at least one with a AAA budget as massive as an Assassin’s Creed game, to render this kind of world in such lavish detail. Red Dead Redemption 2, maybe?

I have been eager to return to Assassin’s Creed with Origins, but I’m definitely going to be checking out this mode as well, as I love history (though I'm far from a buff) and this seems like exactly the kind of thing I’d have a blast with. Again, I hope to see more of this in the future, but I’m not sure who could pull something like this off besides Ubisoft with the AC series.

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Educational mode planned

All of the research put into Origins will be used in an upcoming feature called the Discovery Tour, which will be added to the game early next year. The feature essentially turns the game's giant map into a virtual museum, stripped of all narrative or combat.

"It's a bit like in the museums, so you start the tour and there is a path that is lit on the ground that you follow on your own pace, and then you'll reach a station," Guerson said, adding that each station will have an audio guide.

Ferron thinks the Discovery Tour could be a useful visual guide for teachers who may want to use the game in the classroom.

But perhaps most importantly, the tour also notes when Ubisoft took creative liberties, such as tweaking the architecture to better accommodate players' need to run, jump and climb buildings, for example.

"What they did that I like the most is they addressed their choices. So at one point they'll say, 'In the game we portrayed it like this, but the reality is more that,'" Ferron said.

"Students will understand finally that they need to have a critical mind, even for something like a video game or a movie."


Story-Driven DLC for Assassin’s Creed Origins Incoming

Last week, we reported on the possibility that a New Game Plus mode would make its way to Assassin’s Creed Origins in a future update. While fans of the best iteration of the series in recent memory are clamoring for more of the game, the first piece of DLC is set to arrive next week, with The Hidden Ones arriving on January 23, 2018. In addition to The Hidden Ones, details on the Discovery Tour mode and the next piece of DLC, The Curse of the Pharaohs, has arisen.

DLC 1 – The Hidden Ones: This story-driven expansion builds upon the growth of the Brotherhood, taking players four years after the events of Assassin’s Creed Origins as they clash with an occupying Roman force in a new region of the world, the Sinai. This expansion will increase the level cap to 45, allowing players to continue to upgrade and customize their character. Players will have access to four new Legendary weapons, a new outfit, two new mounts and multiple new weapons as well as two new levels for all crafted gear. The Hidden Ones DLC is available for all season pass owners or can be purchased separately for $12.99 on January 23, 2018.

Discovery Tour by Assassin’s Creed: Ancient Egypt: This new educational mode of the game lets everyone, from players to history-enthusiasts and non-gamers, choose between free roaming the beautiful world of Ancient Egypt to learn more about its history and daily life or embarking on guided tours curated by historians and Egyptologists. People can discover and explore a world free of conflict, time pressure or gameplay constraints, where storyline and quests are not active and the world of Ancient Egypt evolves into a combat-free living museum.

DLC 2 – The Curse of the Pharaohs: This new expansion offers players a completely new storyline to delve into as they travel to Thebes to investigate an ancient curse that is plaguing the region. The Curse of the Pharaohs focuses on Egyptian mythology, pitting players against famous pharaohs and Egyptian beasts as they investigate the cause of the curse that has brought the dead pharaohs back to life. This new piece of content will increase the level cap to 55 and give players access to new outfits and gear, including rare and legendary weapons, all themed around classic Egyptian mythology. The Curse of the Pharaohs DLC will be available for season pass owners or can be purchased separately for $25.99 on March 6, 2018.

While DLCs 1 and 2 can be purchased separately or as part of the season pass, the Discovery Tour will be available as a free update for all Assassin’s Creed Origins owners. Additionally, a variety of free content such as a new quest that acts as a prelude to The Hidden Ones will be coming soon.

Did you enjoy Assassin’s Creed Origins? Are you excited for the DLC? Let us know in the comments below.


Assassin’s Creed Origins Will Add Educational Discovery Tour Mode

The Assassin’s Creed series is known for meticulously crafted worlds based on interesting eras of history. October 27 will see the release of Assassins’ Creed Origins, based in Ancient Egypt. This week Ubisoft announced a new non-combative exploration mode called Discovery Tour, coming early 2018 as a free update.

Discovery Tour will let players explore the world of Ptolemaic Egypt with audio guided tours, completely free of combat, story, or time restraints.

“From the beginning the Assassin’s Creed franchise has always explored pivotal moments in history, from the Third Crusade to the Italian Renaissance, and this year Ancient Egypt.” said Jean Guesdon, Creative Director of Assassin’s Creed Origins. “It’s a dream come true for us to offer Discovery Tour by Assassin’s Creed: Ancient Egypt, an educational mode built specifically for people to learn more about the incredible history of Ancient Egypt through the interactive experience made possible via a video game.”

In Discovery Mode players can explore all the locations within the game, including the Nile Delta, Giza plateau, and cities of Alexandria and Memphis. The guided audio tours are curated by professional historians and Egyptologists. Each narration will focus on a different aspect of Ancient Egypt life, such as mummification or the Great Pyramids.

This sounds like an incredibly cool feature to create an interactive learning tool within a AAA game world. Eliminating timing, quests, and combat would allow students and adults to learn about history while enjoying walking around Ancient Egypt. Given Ubisoft’s impressive attention to historical detail in all the Assassin’s Creed games, it’s a shame it took this many games to bring us this feature.

Assassin’s Creed Origins is launching October 27 for PC, PlayStation 4, and Xbox One. It’s been rated M for Mature. The Discovery Tour mode will be added as a free update early 2018.


E3 2019: Assassian’s Creed to Get Ancient Greece Educational Mode

Ubisoft announced that Discovery Tour: Ancient Greece will release early fall 2019. Discovery Tour: Ancient Greece is an educational mode that allows players to discover and explore the world of Assassin’s Creed Odyssey free of conflict and gameplay constraints. It will be available as a free update for all Assassin’s Creed Odyssey owners.

From the heights of snowy mountain peaks to the depths of the Aegean Sea, players can explore an entire country full of untamed environments and cities during the Golden Age of Greece. From ancient rituals to famed statues, they will come face-to-face with legendary Greek figures and discover the truth behind the myths and legends.

Building on the positive reception from the first edition of Discovery Tour that featured ancient Egypt, the second edition keeps fan-favorite features like the stations showcasing the history of ancient landmarks, geography, day-to-day activities of common people and lives of history’s most notable figures. Discovery Tour: Ancient Greece allows visitors to travel throughout twenty-nine regions to over 300 stations with tours of five different themes including philosophy, architecture, daily life, war and myths. It also exhibits new and exciting features that allow players to learn the way they want. Players can easily find what they are looking for while going off the beaten path to explore and discover new opportunities.

With Discovery Tour: Ancient Greece, players are encouraged to take their time and enjoy the most accurate 3D interactive reconstruction of ancient Greece ever made and to take part in interactive guided tours to learn more about this incredible place and time. Based on the dialogue choice system introduced in Assassin’s Creed Odyssey, Discovery Tour: Ancient Greece will test each visitor with an interactive, fun and rewarding quiz at the end of each tour.


New 'Discovery Tour' Game Mode Comes to Assassin's Creed Origins in Early 2018

Ubisoft has revealed a new, educational mode for Assassin's Creed Origins that will teach you more about the history of Ancient Egypt.

Today, Ubisoft has revealed that a new game mode called Discovery Tour by Assassin’s Creed: Ancient Egypt will be coming to Assassin’s Creed Origins in a free update for the game early next year.

Discovery Tour is meant to be educational and teaches players more about the world of Ancient Egypt that they will be spending countless hours in within the main game. Players will be allowed to traverse around various environments and will be able to interact with many items and other structures that will contain detailed, historical descriptions about pertaining to the specific object. Think of it as almost like a museum, if you will.

A more detailed description of this game mode courtesy of Ubisoft is as follows:

In this dedicated mode, players can free roam the entire interactive 3D recreation of Ancient Egypt in Assassin’s Creed Origins, free of combat, storyline or time constraints. From Alexandria to Memphis, the Nile Delta to the Great Sand Sea, the Giza plateau to the Faiyum Oasis, players can immerse themselves like never before in the rich history of Ancient Egypt. Discovery Tour will offer dozens of guided tours curated by historians and Egyptologists, each with a focus on a different aspect of Ptolemaic Egypt, such as the Great Pyramids, mummification or the life of Cleopatra.

Jean Guesdon, the creative director on Assassin’s Creed Origins, spoke about why he and the team wanted to implement this mode into the game with the following statement:

“From the beginning, the Assassin’s Creed franchise has always explored pivotal moments in history, from the Third Crusade to the Italian Renaissance, and this year Ancient Egypt. It’s a dream come true for us to offer Discovery Tour by Assassin’s Creed: Ancient Egypt, an educational mode built specifically for people to learn more about the incredible history of Ancient Egypt through the interactive experience made possible via a video game.”

As someone who saw some early footage of Discovery Tour last week, the concept seems quite unique and is unlike anything else I can remember seeing in a triple-A game. For those that really love the historical aspects of the Assassin’s Creed games and are always looking to educate themselves a bit more, Discovery Tour will be right up your alley.

While Discovery Tour won’t arrive until early 2018, Assassin’s Creed Origins itself is nearly upon us and will release next month on October 27 for Xbox One, PS4, and PC.


“History is our playground”: Bringing Assassin's Creed into the classroom

Wednesday 14th February 2018

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In Assassin's Creed Origins, entire communities of digital Egyptians go about their daily lives: farming, trading, weaving and, yes, mummifying. But most players don't see this, too busy scaling rooftops or racing around on horseback and cutting down their enemies.

It must be fairly disheartening for the hundreds of developers at more than a dozen studios around the world. Appromixmately three years was spent crafting the open world of Ancient Egypt, only for gamers to blitz through it in a couple of weeks and move on to the next big release, never fully appreciating the care and attention that has gone into its environment.

Ubisoft has decided to change this with the impending release of the Discovery Tour mode, a combat-free scenario that transforms the world of Assassin's Creed Origins into a virtual museum.

Announced last year and releasing on February 20th, Discovery Tour will be free to everyone who has purchased the game or available as a standalone $20 download on Steam and Uplay.

It will contain 75 guided tours, each between five and 25 minutes long, and educate players not only on the major landmarks that have been recreated in the game but also the cultural and social details many of them may have passed by. Or they can just run around Egypt, exploring it at their own pace.

Given the amount of research that goes into ensuring Assassin's Creed settings are as historically accurate as possible, it's no surprise that franchise historian Maxime Durand is particularly excited about this release.

"The Discovery Tour is a dream that we've had for a very long time," he tells GamesIndustry.biz. "We were lucky that our top management totally supported us on that initiative.

"We think that the massive amount of work and dedication that we've put on recreating Ancient Egypt should be shared with the maximum number of people. We have crafted an open world environment in which we hope our work on credibility allows for players to be totally immersed. Within the Discovery Tours, we can share more details and highlight their value. For us, this is a very interesting avenue when it comes to bringing academic information about a time period."

However, the opportunity goes beyond simply showing off everything Durand and his team learned while making Origins. It also opens up new possibilities for using video games in an area that has historically shunned them: education.

"We think that the massive amount of work and dedication that we've put on recreating Ancient Egypt should be shared with the maximum number of people"

When creating the Discovery Tour mode, Durand and the Ubisoft management gave the developers a very clear guideline: "A teacher should not fear to bring this special mode into their classroom allowing students to immerse themselves in Ancient Egypt and learn more about it in a very interactive way."

Far from a publisher-driven need to reach a wider audience with its flagship franchise - let's not forget Assassin's Creed does have a high age rating and is therefore not appropriate for schoolchildren - this is in part derived from comments that Ubisoft has received from educators.

"For several years now, we have been receiving testimonies from teachers who tell us they're recording 'safe for school' videos of our games to create their own educational material," Durand reports. "This time, not only will they not have to fear to show the content of this unique mode to their students, but it comes with additional academic information curated by historians and Egyptologists."

Guided tours take players through specific elements of Ancient Egyptian culture, based on the most up-to-date information from expert historians

It's a smart way to get young people interested, and with the groundwork already laid by the absurd amount of detail in Assassin's Creed Origins - or indeed any of the previous Creeds - it's surprising we haven't previously seen an educational version of Ubisoft's biggest blockbusters. Perhaps the team may revisit the Victorian London and Revolutionary Paris seen in Syndicate and Unity respectively?

It's also not difficult to imagine Ubisoft partnering with museums to install Discovery Tour as an interactive exhibit. UK promotional events for both Assassin's Creed Origins and this mode were held at the British Museum, world renowned for its collection of Ancient Egyptian artefacts. Is it so farfetched to picture a few PlayStation pods near the real-world mummies with Discovery Tour set to talk players through the process?

"A teacher should not fear to bring this special mode into their classroom allowing students to immerse themselves in Ancient Egypt and learn more about it in a very interactive way."

While it may be easy for the skeptics to dismiss Origins or indeed Discovery Tour as a diorama of Ancient Egypt geared towards entertainment, Durand stresses the amount of meticulous research that has gone into the title and that the Tour will demonstrate this better than the core game ever could.

"This is the [furthest we have gone] back in history, and most of the places we're presenting in Assassin's Creed Origins have nothing left but ruins," he says. "This is why our collaboration with historians and Egyptologists has been key, so we could actually bring Ancient Egypt to life in the most accurate and credible manner.

"The Ptolemaic period that we focus on is pretty well documented, but still there were many gaps to fill in and sometimes the sources themselves could be challenged. For instance, a big part of what we know from Cleopatra comes from her enemies in Rome and from a book associated to Caesar - who was probably not totally objective in the way he presented facts and events.

"Another example is the fact that at the time, most buildings were painted with colours that have since disappeared. In all Assassin's Creed games, recreating the setting and time period is a constant balance between historical facts and artistic vision, but that was even more true for the Ptolemaic Ancient Egypt of Assassin's Creed Origins."

Ubisoft has also taken great pains to ensure Discovery Tour is enjoyable - it's not hard to imagine that removing combat and objectives from Origins leaves players with a large and barren world. But Durand is hoping the abundance of tours, on top of countless short articles and descriptions on the various landmarks, setpieces and native occupations, will make the experience more engaging that some might think.

"History is our playground and we really thrive to make history accessible."

Players will also be able to explore Egypt in a variety of guises, from leads Bayek and Aya to historically significant figures like Cleopatra and Caesar, and while the RPG progression system is gone, there are achievements and trophies for those so inclined. The comprehensive photo mode is also present, no doubt in the hopes that virality will spread the word and encourage more people to try the Tour for themselves.

"With the Discovery Tour, we want people to have the chance to visit a long lost world," says Durand. "We want digital travellers to be immersed and amazed by the variety and the beauty of this country in that time period. Our visitors will be able to take their time and enjoy the most this unique 3D interactive reconstruction of Ancient Egypt in a very accessible way.

"We listened to lots of feedback from the educational world and designed with accessibility in mind - the controls are super easy - so all can take part in interactive guided tours to learn more about this incredible place and time. The possibility to re-use elements available in the game, such as seeing a priest performing some steps of the mummification process, makes the experience really stand out and keeps it entertaining."

Durand is unable to comment on whether more Discovery Tours are planned for future Creeds (we spoke to him ahead of leaks suggesting a possible Viking setting for the series' next outing) but given Ubisoft's track record of exploring fascinating historical periods with its flagship franchise, this very much feels like it's testing the waters for future violence-free virtual excursions.

Notable landmarks will also offer real-world information and historical trivia, educating players on some of the world's oldest wonders

In a way, Ancient Egypt is arguably one of the safest to start with, as it's instantly familiar to audiences of all ages. But when you look at the roots of Assassin's Creed, the series began by exploring periods rarely covered by video games or any other form of entertainment - most notably, the original game's Crusades setting.

As the series has evolved, the range of historical periods covered has grown - some oft-tread by games (Rome, Victorian London, the pirate-ridden Caribbean), others less so (China, India, Russia and the Crusades). And Durand promises the series will continue to explore the "most pivotal moments in history" where it can - whether or not that's via a Discovery Tour.

"[These moments] create opportunities to add to our lore and to create a rich narrative experience around the dualities of order and free will, as represented in the conflict between Templars and Assassins," he says. "Obviously, iconic locations are important to create an interesting and immersive playground.

"History is our playground and we really thrive to make history accessible. The setting of the crusades with an Arab assassin as the main character was certainly a bold decision, and this is also true for many other characters and settings that we have dealt with ever since - for instance, the rise of the Ottoman Empire, or the Slave Rebellions in Haiti, are certainly not subjects that have been covered much by entertainment, yet they were very interesting Assassin's Creed game settings."

He concludes: "The team inspires itself with as many historical references as possible. The more information we can get beforehand, the most likely we'll be inspired to create a world that is close to historic knowledge both in terms of landmark reconstitutions, but also in terms of historical technologies, weapons or any other mean that can influence us.


Watch the video: Assassins Creed Origins. Modo Descubrimiento. Redescubrir Egipto (August 2022).