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By Way of Deception: Making and Unmaking of a Mossad Officer, Victor Ostrovsky and Claire Hoy

By Way of Deception: Making and Unmaking of a Mossad Officer, Victor Ostrovsky and Claire Hoy



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By Way of Deception: Making and Unmaking of a Mossad Officer, Victor Ostrovsky and Claire Hoy

By Way of Deception: Making and Unmaking of a Mossad Officer, Victor Ostrovsky and Claire Hoy

In its time a very controversial book by a former Mossad agent which gives great detail on how the organisation trained its agents, its role , structure and details of various covert operations. Many more liberal readers found and still find the content shocking about how an intelligence service operates but I just found it a fascinating read and was not shocked by what the book contained, maybe this is due to my greater knowledge of the subject than the average person or maybe I am just a cynic.

It still remains a fascinating read and highly recommended to anyone with an interest in Middle East politics or in covert and intelligence operations. The book is divided into three main sections with the first 100 pages covering recruitment and training, the next section the author’s disillusionment with the organisation and how he left and the final part covering several operations which the author was not involved with.

Author: Victor Ostrovsky and Claire Hoy
Edition: Paperback
Pages: 384
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
Year: 1990



ISBN 13: 9780312926144

Ostrovsky, Victor Hoy, Claire

This specific ISBN edition is currently not available.

The first time the Mossad came calling, they wanted Victor Ostrovsky for their assassination unit, the kidon. He turned them down. The next time, he agreed to enter the grueling three-year training program to become a katsa, or intelligence case officer, for the legendary Israeli spy organization. By Way of Deception is the explosive chronicle of his experiences in the Mossad, and of two decades of their frightening and often ruthless covert activities around the world. Penetrating far deeper than the bestselling Every Spy a Prince, it is an insider's account of Mossad tactics and exploits. In chilling detail, Ostrovsky asserts that the Mossad refused to share critical knowledge of a planned suicide mission in Beirut, leading to the death of hundreds of U.S. Marines and French troops. He tells how they tracked Yasser Arafat by recruiting his driver and bodyguard how they withheld information on the whereabouts of American hostages, paving the way for the Iran-Contra scandal and how their intervention into secret UN negotiations led to the sudden resignation of ambassador Andrew Young and the downfall of his career. By Way of Deception describes the shocking scope and depth of the Mossad's influence, disclosing how Jewish communities in the U.S., Europe, and South America are armed and trained by the organization in secret ?self-defense? units, and how Mossad agents facilitate the drug trade in order to pay the enormous costs of its far-flung, clandestine operation. And it portrays a network that has grown dangerously out of control, as internal squabbles have led to the escape of terrorists and the pursuit of ?policies? completely at odds with the interests of the state of Israel. This document is possibly the most important and controversial book of its kind since Spycatcher.

"synopsis" may belong to another edition of this title.

Victor Ostrovsky was born in Canada and raised in Israel. At eighteen he became the youngest officer in the Israeli military at the time, eventually rising to the rank of lieutenant commander in charge of naval weapons testing. He was a Mossad case officer from 1982-1986. Victor Currently lives in Scottsdale Arizona where he paints and has an art gallery in old town Scottsdale.


By Way of Deception : The Making and Unmaking of a Mossad Officer

It only took me 6 years to finish! The yarid branch of the security department consists of three teams deeption seven to nine people each, with two teams working abroad and one backup in Israel. View the Lesson Plans.

On the righthand side of the page you wrote the recipient’s name and who had to act on the message it might be just one person, it might be two or three, but each name was underlined. My main complaint is that his story makes him look great and the Mossad look horrible. The right-wing elements in the Mossad and in the whole country, for that matter had what they regarded as a sound philosophy: Jul 04, Mark Colenutt rated it it was amazing.

Years later, I found myself working for a magazine in Cairo, Egypt. So, they got interesting training techniques. This course was to be known as Cadet 16, as it was the sixteenth course of Mossad cadets.

He even had coffee brought in.

Before you could say Jack Robinson, the two guys were out the door, ostrovssky a car, and gone. He is the only Mossad agent to leave the agency, discuss its covert activities, and survive for more than one year.

The answer is surprisingly easy. Eventually we were taken into a building, still blindfolded, and separated. They’ll give you a new identity and protect you. Somebody had answered the random call now, and was qay, “Who is this? It doesn’t officially exist in Israel, yet everyone knows about it.

By Way of Deception? | Conspiracy School

Metsada, now called Komemiute, is the department in charge of combatants. His passport listed his occupation as a lecturer in the department of atomic engineering, University of Alexandria. At the time, France wanted to sell Iraq a megawatt commercial nuclear reactor. We were to take notes on everything we saw in this surveillance exercise.

But a police blackout on news of the investigation into the sabotage led other newspapers to print speculative stories on who was responsible.

I felt I’d really missed out on something. Now the book reads more like a history text. But once the story was in the hands of the media, there was no telling where it would go.

But, of course, he wag know. He references an old joke that the worst thing a Mossad officer can say to another Mossad officer is “I hope I read about you in the papers. Then the one next to me asked where I was from. Had the book been half as long, I would have given it 4 stars, probably. Accompanying them was what looked like an Aer Lingus commercial carrier the Irish lease their planes to Arab countries, so it wouldn’t seem out of placebut in truth was an Israeli Boeing refueling aircraft.

At this point in the operation, all they had was a name and an address. You know that intersection outside has kstrovsky a few accidents. Whatever was not detected then was buried forever deceptino Mount of Olives in Jerusalem, the resting place ostrovzky the nation’s most revered heroes. They said they’d pick me up later, signaling me by flashing their headlights.

Whenever I took this book with me in public, people seemed to feel the need to stop me and tell me their thoughts on the Mossad.

When all the information was exhausted, we were to write “no more information” on the report, meaning it was complete for the time being. By Way of Deception by Victor Ostrovsky is a fascinating book about the author’s years in the Mossad, the Israeli intelligence service. Without a word said, four of the men entered the van and headed for the city. Jun 14, Evren rated it really liked it.


Mossad: From Zion to Gehenna : BY WAY OF DECEPTION The Making and Unmaking of a Mossad Officer<i> By Victor Ostrovskyand Claire Hoy (St. Martins: $22.95 371 pp.) </i>

At 1 o’clock on a September morning, a group of lawyers for Israel emerged from the home of Manhattan Supreme Court Justice Michael J. Dontzin. As they stepped out onto Fifth Avenue, they had reason to celebrate. For the first time in U.S. history, a judge had banned a book at the request of a foreign government. Only a week before, Israel had also succeeded in getting the book banned throughout Canada.

But the victory would be short-lived. On Sept. 13, less than 48 hours after the sleepy New York judge issued his injunction, an appeals court threw it out. “By Way of Deception” thus has become an instant best seller, making its co-author, former Israeli intelligence officer Victor Ostrovsky, at once very rich and very nervous. Earlier, he said, he had been visited by two Mossad officials who offered him both money and then threats to get him to stop publication of the book. A short time later, Ostrovsky went into hiding.

William J. Casey, the late CIA director, had a favorite quote from Frederick the Great: “It is pardonable to be defeated, but never to be surprised.” A few weeks ago, the highly secret Israeli intelligence organization known as the Mossad was both defeated and surprised. Surprised that one of its former members was about to publish a book detailing the inner workings of the reclusive spy agency defeated when they attempted to have the book banned in the United States.

Co-authored by Canadian writer Claire Hoy, “By Way of Deception” details Ostrovsky’s brief three-year career in what often has been called the best intelligence service in the world. Born in Edmonton, Alberta, to Jewish parents, Ostrovsky bounced back and forth between Canada and Israel, serving in both the Israeli Army and Navy before being selected for service in the Mossad in January, 1983, and eventually becoming a katsa , or case officer.

In his book, Ostrovsky travels a long and painful road from ardent Zionist, believing that “the state of Israel was incapable of misconduct,” to what he calls “the present-day nightmare.” Along the way he found the Mossad to be an organization of “twisted ideals and self-centered pragmatism,” combining “greed, lust, and total lack of respect for human life.”

Unfortunately, Ostrovsky offers little to back up his harsh charges, thus leaving the reader wondering whether his book is an act of revenge, possibly for being fired: He was dismissed following an unsuccessful attempt by Mossad to capture a planeload of high-ranking PLO officials. The capture was successful but the plane contained no one of diplomatic importance. Ostrovsky claims he was used as the scapegoat for the failure.

Nevertheless, while Mossad’s secrecy has made it next to impossible to confirm Ostrovsky’s specific claims--e.g., that the agency runs a clandestine espionage team (known as Al) in the U.S.--many of his allegations appear to fit a long pattern of similar activity by the agency.

Also lending weight to this book’s credibility is the fact that Israel has gone to such unprecedented lengths to prevent its publication. One attorney representing Israel inadvertently gave additional support when he said Ostrovsky “prefers his credibility to the lives of others.”

Some have argued that Ostrovsky was both too junior and too new to learn all that he is reporting, but the author claims that he was able to access Mossad computer files containing information on past operations. The attorney representing Israel in a way confirmed this when he admitted that even as a low-level employee, Ostrovsky could have had “access” to important secrets.

The first half of “By Way of Deception” takes the reader through Ostrovsky’s recruitment and training, serving as a veritable manual of Mossad craft: how to establish a cover, evade surveillance, plant a bug and all the other tricks of the trade.

But the real substance comes in the last half of the book, which outlines a number of highly questionable operations. Most serious is his charge that a Mossad informant in Beirut passed on information about a Mercedes truck being outfitted by radical Shi’ite Muslims to carry an exceptionally large quantity of high explosives. Because of its unusually large explosive capability, Mossad officials felt that there were “only a few logical targets, one of which must be the U.S. compound.” But rather than pass on these details to their U.S. counterparts, Mossad decided to send only a standard warning which was all but useless.

“We’re not there to protect Americans,” Ostrovsky quotes Mossad director Nahum Admony as saying. “They’re a big country. Send only the regular information.” On Oct. 23, 1983, a similar truck smashed into the Marine barracks, killing 241 servicemen. “The general attitude about the Americans,” wrote Ostrovsky, “was: ‘Hey, they want to stick their nose into this Lebanon thing, let them pay the price.’ ”

Far more damaging to Israel than the words between the covers of Ostrovsky’s book is the fact that it could have been written at all. The violent tremors caused by the country’s iron-fist policies in the occupied territories have now penetrated even the Mossad’s heavy black cloak.

“The intifada and resultant breakdown of moral order and humanity,” Ostrovsky concludes, “are a direct result of the kind of megalomania that characterizes the operation of the Mossad. That’s where it all begins. This feeling that you can do anything you want to whomever you want for as long as you want because you have the power.”


By Way of Deception: The Making of a Mossad Officer

This book caused a stir on its publication and has largely been forgotten since, but it may never be surpassed as an exposé of a secret service.

Israel&aposs Mossad is regarded as the best in the world, which may not be a flattering remark when you discover what they get up to and how their dynamics work. Don&apost forget, this is not a democratic organisation, but rather the overseer of one.

It is the creator of its own claustrophobic trappings. Once you enter the organisation you can never leave, but th This book caused a stir on its publication and has largely been forgotten since, but it may never be surpassed as an exposé of a secret service.

Israel's Mossad is regarded as the best in the world, which may not be a flattering remark when you discover what they get up to and how their dynamics work. Don't forget, this is not a democratic organisation, but rather the overseer of one.

It is the creator of its own claustrophobic trappings. Once you enter the organisation you can never leave, but that is precisely what this writer did, and then he went on to write about it in an international bestseller. Not very secret now.

The reader is taken on a no-holds-barred journey through the secret service from initiation right through operations until the author's eventual exit from the force.

With such an organisation standing behind the seat of power, it does make you question who is pulling the strings and how such a group can be tamed by mere political decisions. Governments change secret services stay put and have no intention of leaving.

Certain elements from this book have also appeared in Brad Pitt's CIA training sequence in the film 'Spy Game'.

The book was written with a democratic purpose in mind, aiming to get the truth out despite his life being on the line. For that alone it is worthy of being read and recommended.

On finishing the read and reflecting on the book your last question must be, that's the Mossad now what about the secret service in my country? If you don't ask yourself this then you have understood nothing about what the book is really trying to say. . more

2.5 stars. Some parts of this book were really fascinating. I especially liked the recruiment/training section in the early part of the book together with the desciption of how the Mossad is organized. You could tell that these sections were certainly written by someone who knew what they were talking about.

While the "operational" sections were also interesting, I found my enjoyment was hindered by my inability to be certain of the accuracy of the accounts in this section. Even so, it was still 2.5 stars. Some parts of this book were really fascinating. I especially liked the recruiment/training section in the early part of the book together with the desciption of how the Mossad is organized. You could tell that these sections were certainly written by someone who knew what they were talking about.

While the "operational" sections were also interesting, I found my enjoyment was hindered by my inability to be certain of the accuracy of the accounts in this section. Even so, it was still an interesting read and I plan to read the second book by Ostrovsky, The Other Side of Deception: A Rogue Agent Exposes the Mossad's Secret Agenda. . more

This is a troubling book. By Way of Deception, told to Claire Hoy by former Mossad agent Victor Ostrovsky, chronicles not only Ostrovsky’s four years in training as an agent for Israel’s elite intelligence agency, but also a variety of related activities occurring both within Israel and throughout the world. Form the picture he paints, it seems that many international crises of the 1970s and 80s involved the Mossad to a much greater extent than anyone – even the Israeli government – was ever awa This is a troubling book. By Way of Deception, told to Claire Hoy by former Mossad agent Victor Ostrovsky, chronicles not only Ostrovsky’s four years in training as an agent for Israel’s elite intelligence agency, but also a variety of related activities occurring both within Israel and throughout the world. Form the picture he paints, it seems that many international crises of the 1970s and 80s involved the Mossad to a much greater extent than anyone – even the Israeli government – was ever aware.

That the book is 20 years out of date gives it far less a sense of urgency than it probably once had. When it was originally published, the events described within were still current events, and were very much on everyone’s mind. Now the book reads more like a history text. Nevertheless, the material covered is still quite fascinating, and Ostrovsky presents a different perspective than I’m sure most people had access to from media current in the late 70s and early 80s.

Whether Ostrovsky is an entirely reliable narrator is up for debate. For one thing, he reiterates repeatedly that those who have gone through the same training with him have learned never to tell the entire truth, or to tell a straight story. It thus becomes quite difficult to determine the accuracy of his accounts, especially since there is no real way to verify the information (unless you are a Mossad agent – and even then, it seems that the information may be compromised or manipulated). Furthermore, Ostrovsky’s motivation for writing this book is never made entirely clear. Though he claims to want to help Israel by revealing this information, it seems that most readers would use this text as further fodder for anger or hatred, rather than for any positive purpose. Ostrovsky does not conclude the narrative with any sort of overarching theme or message – he just sort of stops relating anecdotes when he catches up with the present.

If what Ostrovsky relates in this book is at all true, it would be nice to see some sort of oversight imposed upon the erratic and surreptitious Mossad. But revealing a nation’s intelligence secrets to the general public does not seem to have any direct benefits for the country whose secrets are being revealed. I have to wonder, then, whether Ostrovsky is instead using this narrative as a platform for boasting, for showing off, for letting everyone know how much he knows, and that he was sufficiently strong-willed not to get roped into the group-think that has become a danger to the political health of the Mossad. If he had truly wanted to help Israel, wouldn’t he be better off sharing this information with the Israeli government?

Despite my criticisms of the book’s apparent failure to achieve its purported purpose, it was an enjoyable and interesting read (though rather long). I learned quite a bit about the international political climate in the 1970s and 80s, and was fascinated to learn how such a small organization can accomplish so much. Some of the Mossad’s tactics – if indeed Ostrovsky’s reporting is true – were quite fascinating. I’m torn between recommending this book widely and hoping it slips quietly into the background.

Ostrovsky, Victor and Claire Hoy. By Way of Deception. New York, NY: St. Martin’s Press, 1990. 0-312-05613-3 . more

It only took me 6 years to finish! I still ask myself why. The first part of the book is riveting. I blew through it. It&aposs all about Ostrovsky&aposs training as a Mossad officer.

Part 2 gets into the operations he and/or the Mossad was involved in. Many of these took place in the 1980s. For some reason, I started to lose interest in Part 2 and eventually put the book down. I think I lost interest because it&aposs difficult to track all the people and places involved, especially since these people are no It only took me 6 years to finish! I still ask myself why. The first part of the book is riveting. I blew through it. It's all about Ostrovsky's training as a Mossad officer.

Part 2 gets into the operations he and/or the Mossad was involved in. Many of these took place in the 1980s. For some reason, I started to lose interest in Part 2 and eventually put the book down. I think I lost interest because it's difficult to track all the people and places involved, especially since these people are no longer in the news.

I finally decided to finish and read the final 20% of the book today. The final chapters are actually pretty interesting as they detail some pretty intense (and deceptive) Mossad operations. Again, there are many names and places the average reader won't recognize, and they are usually only relevant for one chapter. So it's tough to keep everything straight. Nevertheless, still interesting reading.

The biggest takeaway from this book is that the Mossad is a powerful intelligence agency that has international reach and will stop at nothing to further the interests of Israel. . more

In part this book is an autobiography of the author, for several years an officer in the Israeli Mossad, in part it is a history of that intelligence agency for the years of his participation in it, in part it is a critique of the Israeli governmental system which allows its primary intelligence arm to operate without civilian oversight and often contrary to the will of elected officials.

That Ostrovsky was a Mossad officer is not in question. The government of Israel attempted to have this book In part this book is an autobiography of the author, for several years an officer in the Israeli Mossad, in part it is a history of that intelligence agency for the years of his participation in it, in part it is a critique of the Israeli governmental system which allows its primary intelligence arm to operate without civilian oversight and often contrary to the will of elected officials.

That Ostrovsky was a Mossad officer is not in question. The government of Israel attempted to have this book banned. The details of the book are. If true, then the Mossad, like our own C.I.A., is a major player in the world of illegal drug trafficking. If true, the the Mossad has operatives spying within the United States has torpedoed Israeli-Palestinian peace accords on several occasions has actively promoted international conflicts, often supplying both sides with (dis)information and weapons conducts assassinations regularly, often with little regard for innocent bystanders manipulates the intelligence agencies of other countries, including our own manipulates Israeli domestic politics to insure right-wing support in its executive branch resells military supplies from the U.S.A. at considerable profit initiated the Iran-Contra debacle, then feigned the death of one its prime architects to prevent Reagan's impeachment actively supports right-wing military dictatorships, often in league with the United States supports illegal, secret armed cells in virtually every country of the world, including our own et cetera.

Naturally, the book is a page-turner. Notable is Ostrovsky's account of the Mossad's understanding of the assassination of President Kennedy.

Yet, despite all the dirt which led to the author leaving the agency, his account is not entirely negative and is substantially a call to put the Israeli intelligence community under governmental oversight and control. . more

The book is thrilling but to what extend it is true. well I don&apost know. It is meant to be an insider account of the most reputed spy agency in the modern world, the author being an expelled cadet of the agency.

Any experiment in the history of nation building will always be wrapped in colourful packaging of heritage, deeds of heroes from time immemorial, stories of valour, destiny and so on. So was the modern state of Israel. The book, while giving an interesting view of the life of a cadet in The book is thrilling but to what extend it is true. well I don't know. It is meant to be an insider account of the most reputed spy agency in the modern world, the author being an expelled cadet of the agency.

Any experiment in the history of nation building will always be wrapped in colourful packaging of heritage, deeds of heroes from time immemorial, stories of valour, destiny and so on. So was the modern state of Israel. The book, while giving an interesting view of the life of a cadet in Mossad, also provides a commentary of Israel from the engaging years under Golda Meir and Begin.

It could be read like a thriller. I feel it should be treated like one too . more

A very interesting, if a little scattershot, detailed and disturbing account of Mossad training and operations. Even though his experiences are now 40+ years old, and the book itself is 30, it is still entirely relevant. Not least, like U.S. "might is right" covert imperialism, to understand how geopolitics really works - power, the ugly truth.

Having read a lot about covert action/intelligence of the CIA, I was not surprised to read how linked Mossad is to Israeli business interest. In a sense, A very interesting, if a little scattershot, detailed and disturbing account of Mossad training and operations. Even though his experiences are now 40+ years old, and the book itself is 30, it is still entirely relevant. Not least, like U.S. "might is right" covert imperialism, to understand how geopolitics really works - power, the ugly truth.

Having read a lot about covert action/intelligence of the CIA, I was not surprised to read how linked Mossad is to Israeli business interest. In a sense, both agencies are immoral marketing and sabotage agencies acting on behalf of corporate interest, and based on a concept of national/ethnic superiority. Like the CIA and MI5/6, they are the Praetorian guard to the oligarchy, and ultimately, they are fascist. This merging of arrogance, violence and power - a belief in perpetual war and the merging of corporation and state – is basically Mussolini's definition of fascism as holiness (corporate/national identity) and heroism (power). Just, it is hidden and therefore protected. At this point in history, though, it is only hidden by propaganda narratives, in plain sight.

I was also not surprised to hear of the importance of front companies, global networks of volunteers, illegal drugs and arms trading for illicit income, and how, since the 70s, Mossad are a for-hire special forces (e.g. death squad) training consultancy for anyone who will pay, sometimes, even if they are a potential enemy (then you are in the even murkier world of provocateurism, or "increasing market demand"). And, again, sales agents for Israeli arms. None of this separates Mossad from the US agencies activities, just their way of doing it seems proportionally more corrupt and improvised, as befits a much smaller agency bordered by enemies.

The biggest surprise was hearing how one-sided the Mossad-CIA/US relationship was/is. For example, Ostrovsky claims Mossad knew in advance of the 1983 Beirut truck bombings of US marine barracks, which killed 241 U.S. marines, but didn't want to risk blowing their source. Surely there's a way to warn without doing this? F*ck everybody else, I think the motto is.

Another surprise of sorts is how he lived to tell the tale. There's a maxim (of a "limited hangout") that intelligence services mostly only let you know what they want you to know, which means there are probably even worse things that remain hidden. The Epstein ring, for example.

It’s depressing to realize all the "blowback" and destruction of life from this hyper-cynical covert immorality, not just on, for example, different Arab nations and people, but on Israelis, the U.S. and groups in Latin America, across the Middle East and Africa (lots of overlap to South Africa) that are affected by the Mossad training of "special forces", arms sales and operations with no regard for (most) human life.

If you've followed the Epstein case, it’s also interesting the regularity with which "sexual blackmail" comes up it's even a part-time side hustle for some students at the academy, capitalizing on available toys and resources and practicing their burgeoning skills to make some money. Pays better than flipping falafel. Of course J Edgar Hoover's 37 year rule as FBI director was entirely based on sexual blackmail, so it’s nothing new.

And talking of sexual. there is a bizarre incident recounted in the book, where he and some others were studying/working late and stumbled on many of the staff in an after-hours pool orgy. I'm not a prude, but somehow this decadence reeks of a tribal moral vacuum. and a fall of Rome.

The book reminded me of, and he reflects similarly, the idea that the militant supremacist state of Israel, and all of its crimes, is an inherited trauma of war and persecution itself the cycle of violence. He states it as an irony and hypocrisy, but it’s also pure logic that hate breeds hate and the brutalized become brutal. Did you know that trauma is inherited epigenetically? Intense experiences change our DNA and bodies and we pass it on we carry the past and must understand it to understand ourselves.

Anyone who talks of superiority, of making a certain group "great again," needs to understand that this immorality and violence of Mossad, of tribalistic superiority and violence, is the end result of that worldview. Come together or blow each-other apart. Without universal humanism, the potential to respect the "other" as "us" - the other is dehumanized and we perpetuate the traumas and atrocities, and we remain cheap pawns in oligarch war games.

And so. what to do? Transparency? Oversight? Defunding? Boycott? Separate corporation from State? All I know is everyone's worldview is built on a concept of truth, and so understanding these hidden powers and all their f*&ed up effects is essential to understand your short life and try and participate in attempts at democracy. . more


Claire Hoy – Recovering From Bankruptcy, Summer Series Interviews

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Once a week during July and August, I am featuring one of the interviews from my book, Tales of People Who Get It, and post it on the blog so that you may learn from some of the interviewees, as well as introduce the interviewees to a new audience. This week, I feature Claire Hoy, who reminds us that bad things can happen to anyone.

Claire Hoy was a public figure, and after a big high in his career had to declare bankruptcy. A satirical magazine had a field day with Claire Hoy's experience.

In 2007, I published my book, Tales of People Who Get It, which is based on interviews with successful people. The Invisible Mentor blog was born of my book. Let’s take a step back in time to the fall of 2007, I had been thinking about ways to market Tales of People Who Get It and hoping for a burst of inspiration.

While I was taking a walk in High Park in Toronto, it popped into my consciousness that Tales of People Who Get It was my Board of Invisible Mentors. What happened, without being aware of it, is that when I faced a problem, I would remember parts of interviews that I had conducted, and would know how to solve that problem. After conducting research, The Invisible Mentor blog was born, and five years later the concept of the invisible mentor has changed.

Claire Hoy: One of the biggest challenges that I faced was when I had to declare bankruptcy. I never had any money problems until I had some money. In 1990, I co-authored By Way of Deception: A Devastating Insider's Portrait of the Mossad, a New York Times bestseller, with Victor Ostrovsky. The book was a huge bestseller and the only Canadian nonfiction book to be number one on the New York Times Bestseller’s List.

With this new money, we invested in several apartment buildings. Our timing was bad! Bad timing coupled with a lawyer we worked with who turned out to be a bit dicey, had a gambling problem, and ended up getting disbarred, forced us to declare bankruptcy.

Being a very public figure and in the media, the bankruptcy was in Frank magazine. This satirical magazine ran a two-page spread with all the details of the bankruptcy.

The bankruptcy was a big financial challenge because my children were still in school, I didn’t have a full-time job and there is a stigma attached.

Claire Hoy: You can go to the tallest building and jump off, or you can carry on and say there it is and get back on your feet and resolve to make your way through. It took me five to six years to recover. I decided to work harder since I didn’t have a full-time job, and I wrote lots of columns and more books.

We also reassessed things to determine where we were spending money and downscale based on that. In a situation like this, there are two things that you must do – spend less and bring in more money.

  1. When things appear bleak, you can throw up your hands and jump off a tall building or deal with the situation. But, going bankrupt isn’t that bleak. It’s an inconvenience and it doesn’t make you feel good and your creditors aren’t pleased either.
  2. Most people have some skills to offer and just because you made bad investments or had some bad luck, you still have the same skills that got you ahead before. It’s like playing golf, which I do a lot of. Just because you had a bad shot in golf doesn’t mean that it’s the end of the day or the end of your life. You just say that hopefully the next shot will be better.
  3. I learned that when it comes to financial wizardry I am not very good at it, so now I get the professionals to do it. I focused on my strengths.

How to Integrate Your Personal and Professional Life

Claire Hoy: That’s a problem. One thing I regret to some extent is that when I was in my first marriage, we had two children and I was just starting out in the business and working my way up, I spent a lot more time at work than I should have. It was only after my first wife died that I realized I had to be at home more because the mother is gone and the children need a father. They were ten and eight years old at the time. That taught me a lesson and it made it very clear to me the importance of being around your family. This is far more important than anything that I might do at work. From that time on I understood the importance of going to your child’s ball game or a graduation ceremony.

I look back at my father where he and I didn’t have a very good relationship. I don’t ever remember him taking me anywhere or coming to watch me play hockey, baseball or any of the sports that I played. Early in my career because I was starting out as a journalist and wanted to be a columnist, at a newspaper, I lost sight of the really important things and lost balance. In the scheme of things the family is more important than work.

Years ago when I was covering Queen’s Park and Bill Davis was Premier of Ontario, he went out of his way to be home by 7:00 am to have breakfast with his children because otherwise he wouldn’t see them. I learned from that because despite the fact that he had a busy job he realized that there was more to life than being Premier of Ontario and having the kind of power that comes with it. This was a good life lesson for me.

Claire Hoy: First, you have to decide what success is. I consider myself very successful in my life now. I am not wealthy beyond my wildest dreams, but I love my life. I have five healthy children who are happy and doing well. My partner is happy and doing well and I think that’s successful. I get to play golf four times a week, I work at home, write and do radio and television stuff and get to do the kinds of things that I love to do. And, the best thing is that I do not have to do it at someone else’s behest.

Most people look at success in economic or status terms , but I look at success in terms of doing what you like, and enjoying the lifestyle that comes about. So many people get so wrapped up in the traditional view of success, such as getting to the top so that all the other things that are not part of that get left out. No one on their death-bed ever said that they wished that they had spent more time at the office. People say I wished I had spent more time with the children, playing golf, going to the opera and whatever it is that they do.

Claire Hoy: It’s really funny because I have had some regrets and setbacks in life, but it’s always been my attitude not to dwell on them. My first wife died from cancer at 33 years old and we had two young children. I wish that hadn’t happened. There is nothing I could do about it. That was the way it was. I split up with my second wife. I was fired about six times from various jobs, and I had to declare bankruptcy. All these things are regretful, but I just do not dwell on them. I just do not have one single thing that is a major regret.

If I look back on my life and everything that has happened, I can’t really say that I would have done anything differently from what I have done. I don’t dwell on things that went badly, I tend to look forward and say that everyone has good and bad things happen to them.

I know people, and I am sure you do too, who dwell on all the bad things that happen to them and end up being so sour. I remember years ago when I was working for the Toronto Star, we had great difficulty ideologically and I ended up getting fired and that was a very good thing because I wasn’t happy there and I probably wouldn’t have left on my own accord. It’s the only job I have ever had where I hated going in, in the mornings. I was grumpy with the people around me because I hated the job so much. At the time I was regretting having that job, but when I was looking back, I realized that I was turning into one of those people who was moaning and groaning all the time. I didn’t like that because it was the only time in my life when I had fallen into that and it convinced me not to do it again.

Ever since then, I have turned down things that I could have made money on. People who are sitting in their offices at 10:00 pm trying to finish a report that is so important, should ask themselves if five years from now if they are going to have any recollection of what was so important about the report. Your children will always be important.

I constantly remind myself of these sorts of things and that’s how I keep a balance in my life.

Not keeping a balance leaves your children without a father or mother figure and it gives the impression that the family isn’t important, which leads to breakups in relationships.

Claire Hoy: I like “Worrying about something is like paying interest on a debt you don’t even know if you owe” by Mark Twain and “It ain’t over till it’s over” by Yogi Berra because I view them as great life lessons. In Mark Twain’s case he is saying that if you are going around and worrying and fretting how bad something is going to turn out, almost all the time it never turns out as badly as you perceived. In Berra’s case, if you don’t throw up your hands when things go wrong, but think it isn’t over and that you still have a chance, anything is possible. For me bankruptcy wasn’t the end of the world, it looked bad, but I got through it.

Claire Hoy: The New Testament has been my moral compass and when I have had serious problems I learned from it. It shaped the way that I try to conduct my life. Whenever I have heavy personal issues I reach for it. My moral values are based on The New Testament. It is the runaway winner for influencing my life. There are life lessons in the context of teaching you something. It is filled with people facing all kinds of adversities and how to deal with them.


By Way Of Deception: The Making And Unmaking Of A Mossad Officer (Paperback)

The #1 NY Times bestseller the Israeli foreign intelligence agency, Mossad, tried to ban. By Way of Deception is the true story of an officer in Israel’s most secret agency: Author’s Forward Prologue: Operation Sphinx Recruitment School Days Freshmen Sophomores Rookies The Belgian Table Hairpiece Hail & Farewell Strella Carlos Exocet Checkmate Helping Arafat Only in America Operation Moses Harbor Insurance Beirut Epilogue Appendices Glossary of Terms Index

The #1 NY Times bestseller the Israeli foreign intelligence agency, Mossad, tried to ban. By Way of Deception is the true story of an officer in Israel’s most secret agency: Author’s Forward Prologue: Operation Sphinx Recruitment School Days Freshmen Sophomores Rookies The Belgian Table Hairpiece Hail & Farewell Strella Carlos Exocet Checkmate Helping Arafat Only in America Operation Moses Harbor Insurance Beirut Epilogue Appendices Glossary of Terms Index


By Way of Deception: The Making of a Mossad Officer

This book caused a stir on its publication and has largely been forgotten since, but it may never be surpassed as an exposé of a secret service.

Israel&aposs Mossad is regarded as the best in the world, which may not be a flattering remark when you discover what they get up to and how their dynamics work. Don&apost forget, this is not a democratic organisation, but rather the overseer of one.

It is the creator of its own claustrophobic trappings. Once you enter the organisation you can never leave, but th This book caused a stir on its publication and has largely been forgotten since, but it may never be surpassed as an exposé of a secret service.

Israel's Mossad is regarded as the best in the world, which may not be a flattering remark when you discover what they get up to and how their dynamics work. Don't forget, this is not a democratic organisation, but rather the overseer of one.

It is the creator of its own claustrophobic trappings. Once you enter the organisation you can never leave, but that is precisely what this writer did, and then he went on to write about it in an international bestseller. Not very secret now.

The reader is taken on a no-holds-barred journey through the secret service from initiation right through operations until the author's eventual exit from the force.

With such an organisation standing behind the seat of power, it does make you question who is pulling the strings and how such a group can be tamed by mere political decisions. Governments change secret services stay put and have no intention of leaving.

Certain elements from this book have also appeared in Brad Pitt's CIA training sequence in the film 'Spy Game'.

The book was written with a democratic purpose in mind, aiming to get the truth out despite his life being on the line. For that alone it is worthy of being read and recommended.

On finishing the read and reflecting on the book your last question must be, that's the Mossad now what about the secret service in my country? If you don't ask yourself this then you have understood nothing about what the book is really trying to say. . more

2.5 stars. Some parts of this book were really fascinating. I especially liked the recruiment/training section in the early part of the book together with the desciption of how the Mossad is organized. You could tell that these sections were certainly written by someone who knew what they were talking about.

While the "operational" sections were also interesting, I found my enjoyment was hindered by my inability to be certain of the accuracy of the accounts in this section. Even so, it was still 2.5 stars. Some parts of this book were really fascinating. I especially liked the recruiment/training section in the early part of the book together with the desciption of how the Mossad is organized. You could tell that these sections were certainly written by someone who knew what they were talking about.

While the "operational" sections were also interesting, I found my enjoyment was hindered by my inability to be certain of the accuracy of the accounts in this section. Even so, it was still an interesting read and I plan to read the second book by Ostrovsky, The Other Side of Deception: A Rogue Agent Exposes the Mossad's Secret Agenda. . more

This is a troubling book. By Way of Deception, told to Claire Hoy by former Mossad agent Victor Ostrovsky, chronicles not only Ostrovsky’s four years in training as an agent for Israel’s elite intelligence agency, but also a variety of related activities occurring both within Israel and throughout the world. Form the picture he paints, it seems that many international crises of the 1970s and 80s involved the Mossad to a much greater extent than anyone – even the Israeli government – was ever awa This is a troubling book. By Way of Deception, told to Claire Hoy by former Mossad agent Victor Ostrovsky, chronicles not only Ostrovsky’s four years in training as an agent for Israel’s elite intelligence agency, but also a variety of related activities occurring both within Israel and throughout the world. Form the picture he paints, it seems that many international crises of the 1970s and 80s involved the Mossad to a much greater extent than anyone – even the Israeli government – was ever aware.

That the book is 20 years out of date gives it far less a sense of urgency than it probably once had. When it was originally published, the events described within were still current events, and were very much on everyone’s mind. Now the book reads more like a history text. Nevertheless, the material covered is still quite fascinating, and Ostrovsky presents a different perspective than I’m sure most people had access to from media current in the late 70s and early 80s.

Whether Ostrovsky is an entirely reliable narrator is up for debate. For one thing, he reiterates repeatedly that those who have gone through the same training with him have learned never to tell the entire truth, or to tell a straight story. It thus becomes quite difficult to determine the accuracy of his accounts, especially since there is no real way to verify the information (unless you are a Mossad agent – and even then, it seems that the information may be compromised or manipulated). Furthermore, Ostrovsky’s motivation for writing this book is never made entirely clear. Though he claims to want to help Israel by revealing this information, it seems that most readers would use this text as further fodder for anger or hatred, rather than for any positive purpose. Ostrovsky does not conclude the narrative with any sort of overarching theme or message – he just sort of stops relating anecdotes when he catches up with the present.

If what Ostrovsky relates in this book is at all true, it would be nice to see some sort of oversight imposed upon the erratic and surreptitious Mossad. But revealing a nation’s intelligence secrets to the general public does not seem to have any direct benefits for the country whose secrets are being revealed. I have to wonder, then, whether Ostrovsky is instead using this narrative as a platform for boasting, for showing off, for letting everyone know how much he knows, and that he was sufficiently strong-willed not to get roped into the group-think that has become a danger to the political health of the Mossad. If he had truly wanted to help Israel, wouldn’t he be better off sharing this information with the Israeli government?

Despite my criticisms of the book’s apparent failure to achieve its purported purpose, it was an enjoyable and interesting read (though rather long). I learned quite a bit about the international political climate in the 1970s and 80s, and was fascinated to learn how such a small organization can accomplish so much. Some of the Mossad’s tactics – if indeed Ostrovsky’s reporting is true – were quite fascinating. I’m torn between recommending this book widely and hoping it slips quietly into the background.

Ostrovsky, Victor and Claire Hoy. By Way of Deception. New York, NY: St. Martin’s Press, 1990. 0-312-05613-3 . more

It only took me 6 years to finish! I still ask myself why. The first part of the book is riveting. I blew through it. It&aposs all about Ostrovsky&aposs training as a Mossad officer.

Part 2 gets into the operations he and/or the Mossad was involved in. Many of these took place in the 1980s. For some reason, I started to lose interest in Part 2 and eventually put the book down. I think I lost interest because it&aposs difficult to track all the people and places involved, especially since these people are no It only took me 6 years to finish! I still ask myself why. The first part of the book is riveting. I blew through it. It's all about Ostrovsky's training as a Mossad officer.

Part 2 gets into the operations he and/or the Mossad was involved in. Many of these took place in the 1980s. For some reason, I started to lose interest in Part 2 and eventually put the book down. I think I lost interest because it's difficult to track all the people and places involved, especially since these people are no longer in the news.

I finally decided to finish and read the final 20% of the book today. The final chapters are actually pretty interesting as they detail some pretty intense (and deceptive) Mossad operations. Again, there are many names and places the average reader won't recognize, and they are usually only relevant for one chapter. So it's tough to keep everything straight. Nevertheless, still interesting reading.

The biggest takeaway from this book is that the Mossad is a powerful intelligence agency that has international reach and will stop at nothing to further the interests of Israel. . more

In part this book is an autobiography of the author, for several years an officer in the Israeli Mossad, in part it is a history of that intelligence agency for the years of his participation in it, in part it is a critique of the Israeli governmental system which allows its primary intelligence arm to operate without civilian oversight and often contrary to the will of elected officials.

That Ostrovsky was a Mossad officer is not in question. The government of Israel attempted to have this book In part this book is an autobiography of the author, for several years an officer in the Israeli Mossad, in part it is a history of that intelligence agency for the years of his participation in it, in part it is a critique of the Israeli governmental system which allows its primary intelligence arm to operate without civilian oversight and often contrary to the will of elected officials.

That Ostrovsky was a Mossad officer is not in question. The government of Israel attempted to have this book banned. The details of the book are. If true, then the Mossad, like our own C.I.A., is a major player in the world of illegal drug trafficking. If true, the the Mossad has operatives spying within the United States has torpedoed Israeli-Palestinian peace accords on several occasions has actively promoted international conflicts, often supplying both sides with (dis)information and weapons conducts assassinations regularly, often with little regard for innocent bystanders manipulates the intelligence agencies of other countries, including our own manipulates Israeli domestic politics to insure right-wing support in its executive branch resells military supplies from the U.S.A. at considerable profit initiated the Iran-Contra debacle, then feigned the death of one its prime architects to prevent Reagan's impeachment actively supports right-wing military dictatorships, often in league with the United States supports illegal, secret armed cells in virtually every country of the world, including our own et cetera.

Naturally, the book is a page-turner. Notable is Ostrovsky's account of the Mossad's understanding of the assassination of President Kennedy.

Yet, despite all the dirt which led to the author leaving the agency, his account is not entirely negative and is substantially a call to put the Israeli intelligence community under governmental oversight and control. . more

The book is thrilling but to what extend it is true. well I don&apost know. It is meant to be an insider account of the most reputed spy agency in the modern world, the author being an expelled cadet of the agency.

Any experiment in the history of nation building will always be wrapped in colourful packaging of heritage, deeds of heroes from time immemorial, stories of valour, destiny and so on. So was the modern state of Israel. The book, while giving an interesting view of the life of a cadet in The book is thrilling but to what extend it is true. well I don't know. It is meant to be an insider account of the most reputed spy agency in the modern world, the author being an expelled cadet of the agency.

Any experiment in the history of nation building will always be wrapped in colourful packaging of heritage, deeds of heroes from time immemorial, stories of valour, destiny and so on. So was the modern state of Israel. The book, while giving an interesting view of the life of a cadet in Mossad, also provides a commentary of Israel from the engaging years under Golda Meir and Begin.

It could be read like a thriller. I feel it should be treated like one too . more

A very interesting, if a little scattershot, detailed and disturbing account of Mossad training and operations. Even though his experiences are now 40+ years old, and the book itself is 30, it is still entirely relevant. Not least, like U.S. "might is right" covert imperialism, to understand how geopolitics really works - power, the ugly truth.

Having read a lot about covert action/intelligence of the CIA, I was not surprised to read how linked Mossad is to Israeli business interest. In a sense, A very interesting, if a little scattershot, detailed and disturbing account of Mossad training and operations. Even though his experiences are now 40+ years old, and the book itself is 30, it is still entirely relevant. Not least, like U.S. "might is right" covert imperialism, to understand how geopolitics really works - power, the ugly truth.

Having read a lot about covert action/intelligence of the CIA, I was not surprised to read how linked Mossad is to Israeli business interest. In a sense, both agencies are immoral marketing and sabotage agencies acting on behalf of corporate interest, and based on a concept of national/ethnic superiority. Like the CIA and MI5/6, they are the Praetorian guard to the oligarchy, and ultimately, they are fascist. This merging of arrogance, violence and power - a belief in perpetual war and the merging of corporation and state – is basically Mussolini's definition of fascism as holiness (corporate/national identity) and heroism (power). Just, it is hidden and therefore protected. At this point in history, though, it is only hidden by propaganda narratives, in plain sight.

I was also not surprised to hear of the importance of front companies, global networks of volunteers, illegal drugs and arms trading for illicit income, and how, since the 70s, Mossad are a for-hire special forces (e.g. death squad) training consultancy for anyone who will pay, sometimes, even if they are a potential enemy (then you are in the even murkier world of provocateurism, or "increasing market demand"). And, again, sales agents for Israeli arms. None of this separates Mossad from the US agencies activities, just their way of doing it seems proportionally more corrupt and improvised, as befits a much smaller agency bordered by enemies.

The biggest surprise was hearing how one-sided the Mossad-CIA/US relationship was/is. For example, Ostrovsky claims Mossad knew in advance of the 1983 Beirut truck bombings of US marine barracks, which killed 241 U.S. marines, but didn't want to risk blowing their source. Surely there's a way to warn without doing this? F*ck everybody else, I think the motto is.

Another surprise of sorts is how he lived to tell the tale. There's a maxim (of a "limited hangout") that intelligence services mostly only let you know what they want you to know, which means there are probably even worse things that remain hidden. The Epstein ring, for example.

It’s depressing to realize all the "blowback" and destruction of life from this hyper-cynical covert immorality, not just on, for example, different Arab nations and people, but on Israelis, the U.S. and groups in Latin America, across the Middle East and Africa (lots of overlap to South Africa) that are affected by the Mossad training of "special forces", arms sales and operations with no regard for (most) human life.

If you've followed the Epstein case, it’s also interesting the regularity with which "sexual blackmail" comes up it's even a part-time side hustle for some students at the academy, capitalizing on available toys and resources and practicing their burgeoning skills to make some money. Pays better than flipping falafel. Of course J Edgar Hoover's 37 year rule as FBI director was entirely based on sexual blackmail, so it’s nothing new.

And talking of sexual. there is a bizarre incident recounted in the book, where he and some others were studying/working late and stumbled on many of the staff in an after-hours pool orgy. I'm not a prude, but somehow this decadence reeks of a tribal moral vacuum. and a fall of Rome.

The book reminded me of, and he reflects similarly, the idea that the militant supremacist state of Israel, and all of its crimes, is an inherited trauma of war and persecution itself the cycle of violence. He states it as an irony and hypocrisy, but it’s also pure logic that hate breeds hate and the brutalized become brutal. Did you know that trauma is inherited epigenetically? Intense experiences change our DNA and bodies and we pass it on we carry the past and must understand it to understand ourselves.

Anyone who talks of superiority, of making a certain group "great again," needs to understand that this immorality and violence of Mossad, of tribalistic superiority and violence, is the end result of that worldview. Come together or blow each-other apart. Without universal humanism, the potential to respect the "other" as "us" - the other is dehumanized and we perpetuate the traumas and atrocities, and we remain cheap pawns in oligarch war games.

And so. what to do? Transparency? Oversight? Defunding? Boycott? Separate corporation from State? All I know is everyone's worldview is built on a concept of truth, and so understanding these hidden powers and all their f*&ed up effects is essential to understand your short life and try and participate in attempts at democracy. . more


By Way of Deception: The Making of a Mossad Officer

Two weeks from today, I want you here at 9 a. They harassed us by phone for the next eight months. It’s all about Ostrovsky’s training as a Mossad officer.

Some of the stories need to be taken with a grain of salt. Separation and Its Discontents: He told a man he needed a cab because his wife was in the hospital having a baby and he had no money. Finally, he told me I’d passed everything except the final test, but before that, they wanted to meet with Bella.

Any experiment in the history of nation building deeption always be wrapped in colourful packaging of heritage, deeds of heroes from time immemorial, stories of valour, destiny and so on.


By Way of Deception : The Making and Unmaking of a Mossad Officer

It was just a gesture. Sep 25, Boozy rated it really liked it Shelves: They were real pioneers in Israel. He was a Mossad combatant. The expulsion was “a big PR mistake,” says Ostrovsky, noting that the international media and most foreign governments severely criticized Israel.

Overall a good read if you know your Post World War 2 World history well enough. I had already told my wife about it. Marcel was to make one round o a side street near the Ecole Militaire at the appointed time: Halim was far too nervous even to broach the subject of the caramel with Meshad, and the scientist showed absolutely no interest in Halim’s explanation that his friend Donovan was capable of buying almost anything and might be useful to them someday.

When we got there, I was still handcuffed, so I gestured with my head toward the gallery, and said, “My paintings are in there. At the other end, you will come out as the best-qualified intelligence people in the world. In reality it is the Midrasha, the Mossad training academy.

The team flew to Morocco, where they were met by a confederate who’d already taken care of all the necessary equipment and other arrangements. I said I wanted to go back to where they’d found me but didn’t know how to get there.

I felt very insecure, but eventually they became mellow and seemed to believe me. And he has no right to liveexcept if he’s prepared to return to Israel and stand trial.

A man jumped out and flashed a badge. The Mossad was late in giving him back his money, and the usual. With that in mind, it would be a foregone conclusion where the breach was.

Our leaders were captains at the helm of a great ship. I told him ostrosvky was fine with me. In this way, the entire personnel list was sent to headquarters eay two separate computer transmissions. At the same time, news was reaching the Office of a growing scandal caused by Mossad involvement in Germany.

We’ll stay over and come back Sunday. It just smacks of a ostrovsly employee or somebody who’s too full of themselves. My grandparents were very idealistic.


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